Big Blue Diving - Koh Tao - Thailand - Displaying items by tag: KOH TAO
Saturday, 13 October 2018 10:20

Koh Tao and 711 Say 'No' to Plastic Bags

 

Anyone who’s spent time in Thailand will be familiar or perhaps even have an intimate relationship with everyone’s favourite convenience store, the all-conquering 711.  Having supplies of the ubiquitous cheese and ham toasties 24 hours a day, every single day of the year is certainly not to be sniffed at by most Thailand backpackers, who seem to be fuelled almost entirely on a concoction of Pringles, cheese toasties and buckets of cheap booze– thankfully Thailand isn’t a country famous for its cuisine or they may all be missing out on something…

 

However, in an extraordinary move that has surprised the whole of Koh Tao, and after decades of asking politely, demanding, begging, pleading and grovelling it seems that the powers that be at 711 have finally taken our advice and stopped giving out unnecessary plastics. I’m sure there’s not a person amongst us who hasn’t returned form a 711 trip to find some sneaky frigging plastic spoon or straw slipped into your bag without your knowledge, and often when you didn’t even buy something that warranted the use of one! Packet of cigarettes? Plastic bag. Can of Coca-Cola? Plastic bag and straw. A couple of bottles of Singha to drink immediately? Triple-bloody-bagged, with a handful of straws lurking in them. Multiply this by the 10,000 or so 711 stores just in Thailand, and you can see where the root of the problem lies.

 

Of course we cannot blame 711 entirely for this, as consumers it is up to us to refuse the bags and straws we’re offered. We all no doubt know by now that plastics are a huge worldwide problem and the oceans especially are in particular trouble of succumbing to the invasion of plastics dumped in it by us ungrateful humans, but by cutting out our supplier it’ll certainly help a huge amount.

 

As responsible visitors to this amazing island there are also plenty of other ways to help combat the plastics problem facing all of us – for example you could join in one of the regular beach clean-ups, divers can dive for free (!) on the underwater clean-ups that Big Blue and a handful of other places offer, or you can invest in your own reusable ‘Trash Hero’ water bottle (as seen below) and enjoy the free water fill-ups offered by almost 50 of the dive schools on Koh Tao, Koh Phi Phi, Koh Lipe and more!

 

So next time you go shopping at 711 remember to take your Big Blue tote bag with you (available for free from us when you like our Facebook page) or you’ll be faced with a massive 15 baht fee to use one of the stores bags. Hot food still comes in a little plastic bag, but we must take baby steps here guys, first Koh Tao, next stop the world!

 

 

 Do your part here on Koh Tao with our conservation team here at Big Blue, for more information click here

 

 

 

Published in October
Monday, 08 October 2018 15:49

The Beluga Whale That Spoke

When we think about the loudest creatures on the planet, most minds will go to the trumpet of an elephant, the howl of a wolf or the screech of a woman scorned. In reality, the creatures that make the loudest noises by far are the whales that inhabit our oceans all around the world: the loudest apparently being the sperm whale, which can raise its voice to a crazy 230 decibels underwater – it doesn’t sound that impressive until you consider a 10-ton bomb gives off 210 decibels and a space shuttle launch generates around 170 decibels of noise!

 

So what the hell are these gobby gargantuans going on about anyway?

 

We know that whales make noise to communicate, locate and tell others about food sources, and to find each other. The tend to speak in clicks, whistles and pulsed calls which can travel hundreds of miles underwater, and it’s actually thought the sperm whales’ calls can reach half way around the world…although it would take a few hours.  One of the most talkative whales out there is the beluga, which is where this curious tale begins…

  

The year is 1984, and here I should insert some inane Big Brother pun but I’ve leave that to you lot. The National Marine Mammal Foundation were studying and training dolphins and whales for ‘Cold Ops’ (otherwise called top secret naval stuff) and had a number of belugas undergoing constant training. It was during a normal session when researchers reported hearing what sounded like a muffled conversation, which they described as sounding like someone talking loudly in an adjacent room. It was then that one of the divers (and co-founder of the foundation), Sam Ridgeway, climbed out of the whale enclosure and asked his colleagues ‘Who told me to get out?’

Noc’ was a beluga whale that had been living in the research centre for 7 years, and was very familiar with trainers and the language they used every day with him. It appears that unbeknownst to the staff at the foundation Noc had been working on communicating with his human friends, and had managed to produce a pretty damn good impression of them too, which you can hear for yourself right here:

 

https://www.cell.com/cms/attachment/2021739480/2041549424/mmc2.mp3

 

Pretty remarkable eh? It’s like he’s been listening to them and decided that the English language is simply humans going ‘duh duh duh, doo doo doo’ over and over again, suspiciously like the Swedish language as a matter of fact.

 

To teach him a lesson in showing off and to remind him just who was the boss around there, the researchers immediately inserted tubes into his nasal cavity to try and find out just how he’d managed to produce this kazoo-like sound and discovered he was manipulating pressure in his nasal tract which caused this bizarre noise. The reason why remains a mystery, though Michelle Jeffries, one of Noc’s early trainers, described in an interview:

 “He was very easy-going. He wanted people’s attention. He wanted you to stay around and interact with him and rub him. He didn’t try to bullshit you like some of the dolphins did”

We should take a moment to enjoy that incredible statement about the bullshit from dolphins.

Michelle continued, presumably after taking out her obvious frustrations by kicking a dolphin and eating a tin of cheap tuna:

“He was just glad for your time, and he was very patient. Plus being the younger one, he was a little bit more reactive, eager. Noc was the kid who was willing to try. I think that was part of the thing behind him mimicking speech. He liked watching people. He liked being around people…He wanted to make a connection.”

Noc spoke in this way both underwater and above, responded to his trainers or would spontaneously start chatting away but only if there was a human present or he was alone – strangely he would never talk in this was around the other whales.

So what happened to this genius beluga whale, the first animal (or maybe second after that dog that says ‘sausages’?) to manage a passable attempt at the English language?

 

Dead.

 

 

 

Published in October
Friday, 05 October 2018 16:42

Freediving on Koh Tao

 

When I was a child my family and I would take yearly trips to see my Italian family in Sicily, during which my father would take my ten-year old self and my brothers out spearfishing. The thrill of being in the ocean wielding my very own weapon (a ferocious trident that was my absolute pride and joy) at an age when I was barely allowed to cross the street alone was incredible, and then to go on the hunt for elusive octopus, delicious passing snapper, aggressive eels and basically anything else that looked reasonably edible was something I’ll never forget to this day.

What really had me fascinated was when my father would spend a bit of time breathing quite deeply on the surface for a minute or so, take what seemed like a gargantuan breath and effortlessly disappear beneath the waves to impossible depths for a child to imagine – how did he do it? How could he hold his breath for so long? Why weren’t the fish scared away by him? I had so many questions, and that’s when freediving first piqued my curiosity.

 

It wasn’t till years later that I learnt that what we were doing (in a very amateurish fashion) was called ‘freediving’, and was becoming a very popular pastime for those wanting a little more from their diving. The 1988 Luc Besson movie ‘The Big Blue’ we’re named after then showed me just what freediving could offer with some training and what seemed like a lot of effort, and I was hooked.

 

Surely for people to dive to such depths on just one breath you have to be some sort of super healthy, non-smoking, yoga loving athlete, right?

Wrong!

Freediving is something that everyone (regardless of shape, size, or fitness levels) can try and be successful at – as log as there’s no serious ear problems. In fact, the first man to freedive more 100 metres was 65 years old when he did it!

It starts with learning about the mammalian dive reflex, and controlling the urge to breathe (those contractions you feel in your diaphragm) which we all feel when we’ve held our breath underwater for a while. You learn relaxation procedures to help not just hold your breath for a minute or so but to really push the limits of your body and mind away from their comfort zones, control the feeling that you need to breather and before long enter into the realms of proper freediving – to be able to breath-hold for 2 minutes plus whilst gliding silently around the reefs, without a care in the world.

It’s not so much physical exercise, but more about knowing your body, mastering the psychological effects felt and strengthening our mind’s ability to live the moment peacefully, whilst in full control of the situation. 

 

 

So what are the benefits of learning how to freedive?

The freedom felt whilst underwater without the heavy scuba equipment is really quite exhilarating. Scuba diving is wonderful when you want to spend a long time underwater exploring every nook and cranny, but with freediving the beauty is in its simplicity and silence. 

 

When freediving the marine life you encounter aren’t as skittish as when you’re scuba diving – bubbles from scuba regulators are noisy, and there isn’t that much sound underwater other than the communication of the different creatures down there so it inevitably disturbs everything. Freedivers, on the other hand, appear to be less of a threat, so the creatures down there let you get closer to them, and they also come closer to you – after all you appear to them to be just a new, big fish so they’re also very curious. Of course, you are always limited in the time you can stay down there interacting, but it opens up so many places for exploration where it just isn’t feasible to go scuba diving - maybe there’s no dive centre to rent equipment or get your tanks filled, but with freediving all you need is to don your mask, grab some weight and a buddy and you’re good to go!

 

What’s next?

Easy; all you have to do is set aside at least 2 days of your life to visit us on Koh Tao, and the SSI Level 1 freediver licence can be yours for the rest of your life. To book your courses, or for a little more information take a look here!

 

 

“The scuba diver dives to look around. The freediver dives to look inside.

 

Umberto Pelizzari, world champion freediver.

 

 

 

Published in October
Thursday, 04 October 2018 08:07

Care in the Koh Tao Community

In recent years Koh Tao has really focused on improving the medical services and facilities available here. The opening of the Koh Tao Hospital, a dedicated evacuation speedboat, the Koh Tao Rescue group & then some of our resident divers involvement in the cave rescue of those 12 boys and their coach back in July are just mention of a few of those businesses & people whose hard work and dedication has improved life for everyone here on Koh Tao. Another great introduction to Koh Tao is the Medicine In Remote Areas (MIRA) course which focuses on stabilization of the casualty, through to the skills required for prolonged field care until the arrival of the emergency services. They learn how to render definitive care. If the treatment is in their scope, they are able to administer it completely. If the patient needs to get to a hospital, the Medic can stabilize and render lifesaving aid. So in addition to being able to help the community of Koh Tao these trained Medics will also be a massive benefit to any Dive operation. So who better to send than our own Instructor & Sports physio Sonia Scott & genius pharmacist & Divemaster Claire Messenger. Great stuff girls. Enjoy the course & let’s hope you never have to use it. Ever!

Published in October
Saturday, 29 September 2018 16:36

Sunset City on Koh Tao

Sunsets on Koh Tao are absolutely spectacular. This is the best time of year for it as the sun continues to shine brightly every day now. There's not a breath of wind & the ocean is mill pond flat! The visibility has increased enormously of late & because the Fishing boats haven't been out for a while there seems to be heaps of fish of all varieties frolicking around! And bright red sunsets every night, Frisbee at dusk, & one large Chang to wash it all down with. Aaaah... It’s a diver’s life!

Published in September
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