Big Blue Diving - Koh Tao - Thailand - September
September

September (44)

Here at Big Blue (for the first time in what seems like forever) we have a job vacancy here on Koh Tao, and it’s for arguably the best job the world has ever known: Full Time Divemaster!

The role of the Divemaster here at Big Blue sounds almost too good to be true, to be perfectly honest with you all, and certainly not something where you are actually paid real cash money to perform – you have to dive an incredible tropical divesite (with water temperatures not dropping below 26 degrees here) with a small group of certified divers, and located amazing marine life.

Then comes the hard part – you must then raise your arm, extend a finger and point at whatever you’ve found, whilst simultaneously attracting the attention of your group so they too get to look at it.

Yes, that’s pointing at beautiful things for a living, and getting paid to do so. You can see why we don’t often have any openings in such a wonderful job, as not many of our DMs ever want to leave!

 

Of course, it’s not all pointing at whalesharks, turtles and stupid bloody Nemo. Once every four days to give your ears a bit of a rest we get you to do a day in the Big Blue Diving reception. This entails meeting new divers, explaining what our trips can offer, organising the boats, the equipment needed for each, and the divers allocated to the correct boat. So that’s talking to people about diving, counting things, and a little adding up and multiplication for which a calculator is available (if necessary).

 

Let’s summarise the DM role a bit:

  • Dive beautiful dive sites
  • Find stuff
  • Point at stuff
  • Call people over to look at stuff
  • Count stuff
  • Use a calculator
  • Talk to people about stuff underwater
  • GET PAID

 

I’m sure you’ll all realise that competition for this job is likely to be fierce, so anyone interested in becoming our latest ‘luckiest person in the whole wide world’ should come and see us in person (so we can stare at you and judge you) with your CV, or drop us an email via this website, and we’ll stalk you on your Facebook.

 

Monday, 03 September 2018 10:56

Things to Remember - Koh Tao

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For those of you visiting Koh Tao for the first time there are a few things to be aware of that will really help you get the most out of your visit, and to make sure the time you spent with us on our little piece of paradise leaves you with nothing but fond memories and hopefully a holiday destination that you'll return to again and again. Here I present to you a few things to consider when here:

  1. This is Thailand

It may seem like Ibiza or Cancun at times to some party-goers, but remember that the Thai people are in general quite reserved, and don’t appreciate people causing too much of a commotion. Try not to get into any arguments or raise your voice if things don’t go your way – it won’t help your case at all, and will often make the person you’re arguing with dig their heels in even more so they don’t lose face.

  1. Drink Responsibly

You’ll no doubt discover that Koh Tao is a great place to dive AND to party, but also be aware of just how strong those alcohol buckets are, and how close to being petrol the ’vodka’ or ‘gin’ is that go into them! The Red Bull used isn’t full of amphetamines as the popular myth goes, but does contain a hell of a lot of taurine and caffeine too, a lot more than we’d get back in our drinks in Europe or the US, for example.

  1. Keep an eye on your Things

Tourists can be seen as an easy target for scumbags (like in most of the countries in SE Asia in my experience) and therefore we should be extra careful with our belongings. A great way to lose your purse or bag is to go swimming naked at night, and use the lockers or safe in your hostel/hotel too – backpackers steal from each other surprisingly often too – my one million pairs of missing flip-flops attest to this, as I’m certain there aren’t many Thais out there with size 47 feet! This of course also mean keeping an eye on your drinks when out partying, don’t accept drinks from strangers and don’t leave them unattended at any time – this goes for everywhere in the world, and both men and women.

  1. Be Extra Careful if You’re Driving

Firstly the roads are Koh Tao are absolutely not suitable for beginners, with large potholes, steep inclines to get to the nicest beaches and a lot of sand and other debris on the roads, making them easy to skid on. There are however a large number of scooter rental places here on Koh Tao, and the majority will happily put you on a bike (regardless of being able to drive or not), take your passport as deposit and send you on your way. I’ve lost count of the amount of times I’ve seen people pull out from the bike rental to immediately crash, and then comes the extortionate fees: small scratch on the paintwork? 5000 baht! Broken light? 6000 baht! Butterfly wing touched the seat? 1 million baht!

If you can drive then stick to one of the reputable companies if you’re planning to explore the island by bike (Oli’s, RPM, Island Travel, Koh Tao GoRent, KP Travel) and if can’t…then don’t try to learn here for your own safety and the health of your bank balance too!

 

  1. Drug Use

Most Thailand backpackers will be well aware of the drug scene in the country, in particular smoking the Bob Marley cigarettes, as me Mam would call them. They’re also usually aware that things like ‘Reggae Bar’, ‘Rasta Bar’ or any establishment with the word ‘High’ in their name is often an elaborate code name for the ganja, but remember this does not mean that they’re above the law. If you really must have a bit of a smoke then even if the place you bought it from seems to be untouchable by the local law enforcement, the patrons definitely are NOT. If you get caught with something, you’ll be facing a court case, a large fine and of course the chance of prison time, which is no fairy-tale! In addition no matter how nice it seems to have a wee smoke on the beach, it’s really not worth the risk of being busted so use common sense and simply don’t take the chance in public at all.

 

  1. Getting Home at Night

Treat your journeys home in Thailand (especially after dark) just as you would back in the real world – get a taxi, or walk/get a lift with friends.  I’m sure not many of you would jump on some random strangers bike and let them drive you God knows where, and here shouldn’t be any different. Yes, the taxis are expensive here but safety when travelling should always be at the forefront of your mind, especially when alone in an unfamiliar place and certainly when you’ve had a few drinks too. Bite the bullet and get that bloody taxi, or team with up friends for the stroll home.

 

 

All in all, Koh Tao can be a truly wonderful place if you show respect, exercise common sense and don’t do anything you wouldn’t do in your home countries, no matter how laidback this extraordinary island appears – by following these guidelines you’ll be assured that your trip to Koh Tao will leave you with nothing but happy memories that’ll last a lifetime.

 

Welcome to our home, Koh Tao!

Sunday, 20 September 2015 17:38

Welcome To Our World

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Sunday 20th September 2015originalliabarrett

Working as a diving professional has to be one of the best jobs in the world. We get to play around in the water nearly every day having the freedom and tranquillity of being completely weightless and submerged in silence for the duration of the dive. No phone calls, no emails, just peace and quiet surrounded by an environment so foreign to anything seen on land. Believe it or not but teaching new students how to dive while rewarding is also mentally and sometimes physically hard work.  Not only are we taking new divers to breathe under the water for the very first time, we have to make sure you have understood what we have been teaching you in the pool and the classroom, that you are comfortable and relaxed and most importantly you are diving within safe limits. But it is also AWESOME! The days are long but the first jump in from the boat and the first descent into the new world is unbelievably cool! I have lost count on how many times I have given the time to go up sign and received the thumbs down sign along with head shaking ‘no we don’t want to go back up’. The most common question asked by our students here has to be 'Do you not get bored doing the same thing every day?' The answer quite simply is no. Every day and every dive is completely different, yes the dive sites may be the same but you never know what you might find under the surface, and for many of you it is the first time you have seen any of these marine creatures up close and personal. I have been lucky enough to have seen heaps of turtles but I am more excited for you, my students to see one for the first time, being in his/her world and knowing that they are comfortable with you stay and just hang out and watch them eat and swim or chill out on the bottom. Finding a new baby fish on a dive site also gets our juices flowing, seeing a baby harlequin sweetlips or a new baby Nemo still puts a smile on our face. Ask any member of staff now they ended up working for Big Blue and nearly all of them will say that they came here on holiday/ travelling and fell in love with the sea and Big Blue and just never left. Whether it was from doing the open water course here or already being a certified diver the atmosphere is unbeatable and no one ever wants to leave, it may also have something to do with the taste of a nice cold beer after a day’s diving while watching the sun set over the beautiful Gulf of Thailand. Most of us did our Divemaster training here and hung out working or just fun diving and then taking the next step and becoming an instructor. A career change or break from the daily grind back home is never a bad thing and whether it is for 6 months or 6 years the experience you gain whilst working in this industry is second to none and all transferable to any other job in the world, from customer service, sales, multicultural relationships health and safety to managing logistics and paperwork.

So do you want a change and do something different or turn your hobby into a way to travel the world and make some money then why not visit bigbluepro.com for more information on how to have the best job in the world!

Photo courtesy of Lia Barrett

 

Monday, 07 September 2015 15:01

This Weeks Favourite Fish- The Yellow Boxfish

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Monday 7th September 2015yellow-boxfish

It is Hot Hot Hot right now and the diving is lovely, a couple of Whalesharks have been hanging around lately so everyone is out on our early boats to try and catch a glimpse of the gentle giant.

Many of you travellers are now trying to squeeze as much into your holiday in a short space of time. For those of you who only come to Koh Tao for a night or two we offer a one day try dive, this is not a certification but a taster of what diving is all about. With a maximum of 2 people per instructor we guide you around one of our shallow dive sites, with the option of completing a second additional dive. If after this day you are hooked (which most people are) change your travel plans and stick around for a few more days a get your full Open Water Diver certificate. With nearly all currencies being particularly strong right now it is the best time to come over and get your licence. All of our courses start every single day so no need to worry about availability.

Everybody has their own favourite fish to see and one of the most popular on Koh Tao is the Little Yellow Boxfish. The yellow boxfish AKA Ostracion cubicus, can be found in reefs throughout the Pacific Ocean and Indian Ocean as well as the south eastern Atlantic Ocean. It has been known to reach a maximum length of 45 centimetres (18 in). As the name suggests, it is box-shaped, with tiny little dorsal fins and puckering pink lips. When they are juveniles, it is bright yellow in colour with blue spots. As it becomes older, the brightness fades and on very old specimens the colouration becomes blue as the spots get larger. The fish's diet consists of marine algae, worms, crustaceans and small fish.

Interestingly as a defensive mechanism when stressed or injured it releases an extremely poisonous protein from its skin that proves lethal to any fish in the surrounding waters.

In 2006, Mercedes-Benz unveiled its Bionic concept car, which was inspired by the shape of the yellow boxfish. It was assumed that due to the extreme agility with which boxfish can manoeuvre, that their shape was aerodynamic and self stabilizing. However, if you have ever seen one try and swim you may think this is a rather stupid idea and funnily enough when an analysis by scientists was performed they actually found that the boxfishes agility is instead due to the combination of an aerodynamically unstable body and the manner in which the fish use their fins for movement. Good job Mercedes, maybe you should have done your research first!

Tuesday, 01 September 2015 11:59

Welcome To Our New Shop

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1st September 2015new shop

So it is official the new dive shop is now open and it looks amazing. Lots more space for the shop girls so Jess and the Aeys are happy and the Divemasters have their own little area to work in, it’s all open air (until it rains) and very cool, no air-con needed right now but I’m sure we will be installing some when it gets hot and toasty here. It didn’t take long for us all to get used to it and it’s as if we have been in here for ages.
 
We have recently amended our on-line booking form to include the check the box once you have read through the medical statement. It clearly states that you need to read the statement so please be sure to just to make sure that there are no problems once you get here. If you do answer any yes’ on the form you can print it off and have it signed by a doctor at home before you travel here. This medical goes for ALL courses and for you if you are already a certified diver. We have your health and safety as priority here, so please help us to help you.

It may be getting that time when everyone is heading back to school, but we also have school days everyday here. We have just signed up a new bunch of Divemaster Trainees, who will be working and studying alongside our dive professionals. The course includes classroom lectures, in water workshops and skill demonstrations, but the best part of the course is the unlimited diving every day. The trainees shadow our current team of Divemasters and learn how to lead safely and find all the cool fish, stingrays and nudibranchs. The course also sees them assisting our instructors during all the various courses we have on offer. Divemaster is the first step to being a professional and is the first step to getting paid work in the diving industry. Many of our Divemasters decide to work and gain experience for a few months before they go on the next step of training to become an instructor. The course is designed to allow the trainees to cover all aspects of diving. Many who assist courses realise early on that they want to be an instructor, as the feeling we get when we see the faces of brand new students seeing their first ever parrot fish or turtle is priceless and is the ultimate reward. If you think you have what it takes to be a dive professional, patience, good sense of humour, you are a hardworking team player and have a zest for life you are already half way there. Contact us at bigbluepro.com for more information on the packages we have. Our office is way better than yours!

 

Monday, 29 September 2014 16:30

Big Blue from the Air

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Dive Sites from above
sail-rockHere's something you don't see every day, a photo of Sail rock from the air! It was taken by Big Blue SSI instructor and professional photographer Andy Campbell. He's got one of those "quads", or as I like to call it, a radio controlled helicopter. They seem to be the latest gadgets that people are playing with, and someone has had the brilliant idea of attaching a Go pro to the underneath of it, making it possible to literally look down on the things we see every day! Understandably he was very cautious with it at first, as high tech electronics and water don't tend to mix to well. But over time he's been getting more daring with it, to the point where he'll happily now take it on board the boat and fly it off the deck during his surface interval! We've now got some amazing shots of our fun diver boat Porponawa, and our tech boat Big Blue. When you have such beautiful locations as Chumphon Marine Park and Sail rock in the background, the end result is just stunning. We've also got incredible footage of both our dive resorts, and Sairee beach from the air! If you want to see some of these shots, have a look here at the video uploaded by Big Blue Movies of the 3 day trip to Chumphon Marine Park, organised by the Big Blue Dive Club. If you want to be in any of the aerial shots, then you'll have to come to Big Blue and go diving!

Koh Tao history in brief
It can be quite hard to find out detailed information about the history of Koh Tao, but if you do dig around, you can find some fairly consistent stories of how if came to be the place it is today. It was likely a stopping off point for Malay fishermen for centuries, due largely to its isolated position in the Gulf of Thailand. In the 1800s, there would have been a couple of small villages, while later on in the 1890’s King Chulalongkorn visited the island – which is marked with a monument on Sairee beach. The island remained a quiet place for decades, with a few fishing families and farmers and not much else.
After the Siamese Revolution of 1932, the country moved from being an absolute monarchy to a constitutional democracy (of sorts). Koh Tao was used as a political prison in a similar way to Koh Tarutao in the South. In 1947, the prisoner inhabitants were given a Royal pardon and shipped off out of exile to the neighboring islands of Koh Phangan and Koh Samui. The island was once again abandoned.
The legend then goes that two brothers from Koh Phangan sailed to Koh Tao and settled on the land that is now considered Sairee beach. They farmed and fished and lead a fairly simple lifestyle occasionally trading with those on Koh Phangan.
The Vietnam war came about, which created a tourism boom in Thailand during the 1960s and 1970s for American GIs on R&R. Early backpackers began to explore the Islands in the gulf of Thailand, with dive trips originating from Koh Samui and Koh Phangan. The first full moon party being held on Phangan in the late 1980s. Gradually tourism began to increase on the Islands, and the island began to become more and more developed. First with a few simple shops and dive huts, then resorts, and later bars and other non diving related business. Larger ferry companies such as Lomprayah, Seatran and Songserm began to serve the island with overnight buses originating from Bangkok to fill the many spots on a growing dive industry. The island developed its two main areas of Sairee beach (which is now full of nightclubs, resorts and dive shops) and the sleepier “local” side of Chalok Ban Kao as well as the busy port of Mae Haad.

 

 

Thursday, 18 September 2014 23:10

Chumphon Marine Park 3-day trip!

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3-day trip and full day trips
chumphon-marine-parkAll dive bags are packed, the breakfast and lunch have been ordered, and hopefully everyone participating will have had (by the time this goes to press) a good nights sleep and not overslepted for the 6am departure to begin their three day, 8 dive trip to Chumphon Marine Park! Organised by the Big Blue Dive Club (running out of Big Blue Tech), the trips have become a monthly event, with the aim of allowing people to dive some of the less frequently dived areas within the Gulf of Thailand. The previous trip to Angthong Marine Park was a great success, and this trip looks to be even better, for the simple reason that we already know that the diving is epic there!
Big Blue Diving is the only dive resort on Koh Tao that goes to Chumphon Marine Park, and in all of the full day trips we've run there, we've never known the visibility to be bad. In fact its always been amazing! Also, because the dive sites are not often dived, the fish are more curious of divers. Plus, well, you know, it's a protected area, so the marine life is thankfully extremely abundant. It also has a purposely sunk wreck called the HTMS Prab, which is now a haven for all manner of marine creatures, and sits much shallower than the HTMS Sattakut.
If this is all making you jealous don't despair, although you've missed out on this trip there will be others. Additionally, on the 21st we are running a full day trip out there on our fun diver boat; Porponawa; the fastest dive boat in the universe! Three dives, breakfast, lunch, chocolate brownies, water and as many soft drinks as you can cope with! If you're interested, you just need to go to the Big Blue office to sign yourself up.. then all you have to do is turn up on the day!

Blue Whale numbers on the rise
It's not often we get good news about the state of the marine ecosystem, but here's some encouraging research. California blue whales are believed to have increased in number to up to 2,200! Historic whaling of these incredible animals saw 346,000 of them killed in the colder waters surrounding Antarctica, but since the practice was banned in 1966 they have increased their populations dramatically. The Californa whales live accross a huge area, from Alaska to Costa Rica. The number of blue whales caught in the Pacific was much lower, approximately 3,400 between 1905 and 1971, and their numbers are not as accurately known as for the California whales. But it's a good sign that protecting them has paid off. Let's hope their increase in numbers continues.

 

 

Saturday, 13 September 2014 11:23

Rest in Peace Cesare Benelli

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Cesare Benelli
Cesare-benelliSome very sad news this week, the founding father of scuba diving in Koh Tao passed away; Cesare Benelli. Many years ago he set up a dive school in Koh Samui, called Samui International diving. This was the first dive school in Samui and he took divers to sites such as Sail rock. Not one to just do the same old thing, he realised that as more and more people came to learn to dive or go fun diving, he needed to be able to offer them more, so started exploring the Gulf of Thailand. It wasn't long before he began running trips to Koh Tao, which, in those days was an overnight trip... no lomprayah ferries back then! He discovered many of the dive sites that we visit every day, and legend has it that he named White rock, Red rock and Green rock after the colours of the Italian flag, his homeland.
Seeing that the diving in Koh Tao was better than in Samui, he opened the first dive school here- Planet Scuba. Over time more and more people were drawn to Koh Tao to come diving, and so it slowly developed into the diving mecca it is today. I'm sure it was only a matter of time before people discovered the diving on Koh Tao, but Cesare was the driving force in making it popular early on.
Cesare brought a lot of happiness to a lot of people through discovering the beautiful dive sites we have. May you rest in peace.

Koh Panghan Airport
Announced to great fanfair in 2011 that a new airport was going to be built on Koh Panghan, once construction began everything seemed to go very quiet. But they have a website and everything, and apparently the opening date is now going to be September 2014! Wait a minute, it is Septemeber 2014.... So who knows how close to completion it is, and when it will be finally open for business. The runway will be much shorter than at Koh Samui airport, due to the mountenous terrain, so ti will be limited to 50 seater turboprops, and initially will only run two flights a day to bangkok and back.
It will be interesting to see what the costs will be though, i'm sure they will be very competitive, and it's an hour nearer than Samui, so hopefully it will be a viable option for getting to Bangkok cheaply. No doubt there will be a grand announcement once it's all completed.

 

 

Friday, 05 September 2014 14:02

Great time to visit Big Blue

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September is go!
chumphon-sidemountTrue to form, September is looking good so far on Koh Tao. The sea is flat calm, the weather is scorching hot, and the underwater visibility is absolutely breathtaking! Every dive site is just incredible to dive at the moment. At Chumphon pinnacle yesterday you could see the bottom from the boat, and when diving the pinnacle you could see way way off into the distance; even the thermocline at 40 metres seems to have gone on holiday! I dived the HTMS Sattakut a few days ago- our very own purposefully sunk artificial reef, and again you could see practically the entire vessel from the surface, all 48 metres of it, which is unheard of!
There is a huge array of marine life all over the place too, in the last month we've seen whalesharks, a pod of pilot whales and false killer whales, and on the macro scale the Bruce Lee of the ocean: the mantis shrimp.
September is always a great time to visit, but this is the best one in years! It's a little quieter than usual too, probably because people have been put off visiting Thailand due to the coup. Yet it hasn't affected anything, there is no curfew, no army presence on Koh Tao (and barely any visible signs in Bangkok either). Life continues as it always has- great diving, Sun, sea, lounging on the beach, and a huge choice of amazing food to choose from. Bet you're annoyed you went to Blackpool instead now aren't you....

Mantis Shrimp facts
These little critters are amazing in every conceivable way, so here's a few facts to show you why:

- They can grow up to 11cm long.
- They're very brightly colored. Their shells can be blue, green, red and orange. The forearms are often covered with spots.
- Their eyes are located on long stalks that move independently. They have exceptional eyesight that is used both for the detection of prey and predators.
- Their eyes are also the most complex in the animal kingdom. They can see ultraviolet and polarized light. They have trinocular vision which means that they can see objects using one of the three different parts of eye.
- All mantis shrimps can be divided on spearers and smashes, based on the morphology of appendages and tactic they use to kill the prey.
- Spearers have spiny appendages that are used to stab soft-bodied prey such as different types of worms and fish.
- Smashers have club-like appendages that easily smash shell of snails, oysters, crustaceans and molluscs.
- They attack their prey extremely quickly- 50 times faster than the blink of an eye. With a velocity of 10 meters per second, their punch has the power of a .22 calibre bullet.
- Smashers are famous for their incredibly strong punches that can break the glass of an aquarium!
- Most species of mantis shrimps are solitary and territorial creatures. They fiercely defend their home against intruders.
- They are able to recognize their neighbours by smell, and also by their shape.
- Some species of mantis shrimp are monogamous and spend up to 20 years together. During mating, they often fluoresce.
- Females can lay eggs in the burrows or keep them in their forelimbs until they hatch. Some species exhibit parental care. The female lays two sets of eggs, one for her and the other for the father to take care of the eggs until they hatch.
- Larvae of mantis shrimps swim as a part of zooplankton up to 3 months. They show aggressive behaviour even during the larval stage.
- Mantis shrimp can survive more than 20 years in the wild.

 

Monday, 30 September 2013 18:14

September 30th 2013

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Fundiving- the reason you learned to dive!
Big Blue is well established as being a fantastic place to learn how to dive, or take your diving further with courses for anything you might be interested in, be it technical diving, conservation, freediving or recreational diving. But we are also really good at fun diving! Here's the thing, too many dive resorts around the world, and especially koh Tao neglect fun diving in favour of more lucrative dive courses. For example, most dive schools on Koh Tao only have one boat, so they have fun divers on the same boat as students doing try dives and/or open water courses. This means that the dive sites are dictated by the schedule of that particular course and may need to be very shallow with lots of sand. So the fun divers are not as free to explore the best dive sites that Koh Tao has to offer. Not at Big Blue! We have four boats, and one of them is dedicated to fun divers only, called Porponawa (difficult to translate from Thai!), we like to call it the Millenium Falcon as it's probably the fastest boat in the known universe! Getting to Chumphon pinnacle in 25 minutes (normally takes 50!) and Sail rock in an hour (normally takes two and a half!). the speed of porponawa also gives us access to Chumphon Marine Park, making us the only dive resort on Koh Tao to go there. We like variety at Big Blue so we go wherever the divemasters decide they want to go. If a fun diver wants to request a specific dive site, even better! Speaking of divemasters, we have four of them working full-time, Steven, Darren, Carly, and Phil, all unique in their own way, but all ridiculously enthusiastic about diving and marine life, and they see it as a personal challenge to show you the coolest things they can find on each and every dive. They also know every dive site like the back of their hand; they really should stop looking at their hands though! We're also going to take advantage of quiet season to get the boys at Big Blue Tech to get out looking for new dive sites. We know they're there, and we know where to look, we just have to find them, then we can take you to even more amazing dive sites- exclusive to Big Blue! 

big blue boats

“Awesome Instructors!”
5 of 5 stars Reviewed 29 September 2013- Just had an awesome diving experience with Big Blue Diving. A big thank-you to our instructor, ANT 1 or "Big Ant" who definitely made our diving. Hubby and I found Big Blue through the recommendation of a family member. We originally planned just Open Water SSI but went on to do Advanced Adventurer SSI as we had such a blast. Ant is really knowledgeable about Marine life and passionate about Coral conservation. He made the course really fun whilst providing safe diving practices throughout. He answered our multitude of questions and gave heaps of advice about dive gear and even sites in our homeland (NZ)!. Kate the Australian DMT also accompanied our Advanced course and was a huge help under and out of the water. She is extremely knowledgeable and took great time explaining what we would be seeing and tasks to complete. Both Ant and Kate were really professional and a big laugh on the Island post diving! The water is 30 degrees, visibility is awesome and sea life plentiful! Would recommend the Advanced Course also as the deep dive, night dive and wreck dive were a real highlight.

A-Z of Koh Tao for backpackers
A- Apnea- Big Blue Freediving of course!
B- Big Blue Diving of course!
C- Chang- A delightful Thai beer that redefines the word hangover.
D- Diza bar- Don't ask, just don't ever go there... ever ever ever ever.
E- Elephants- No, that's Koh Chang.
F- er, Big Blue Freediving again?
G- Greasy spoon- Hangover food cafe.
H- Hin Gnam bay- Nice little dive site on the East coast.
I- Instructors; they're everywhere, beware of excessive dive talk and do not feed after midnight.
J- Jitson- small village inland for accommodation longer than a month- nicknamed DMT village.
K- Koh Nang Yuang- Two little Islands next to Koh Tao, great for kayaking to, but not from.
L- Lomprayah- High speed ferry to bring you to Koh Tao.
M- Massage spas- You can't come all this way and not have one!
N- NDL- Twinned with refresher courses if you are a qualified diver but have no idea what it means!
O- Opticians- In Sairee with a big sign in the window that says very precisely- 51.354% off!
P- Porponawa- The fastest boat in the universe.. didn't you read the first news story?
Q- Quinine- Ingredient in tonic water that mosquitos hate. that's the best I could do.
R- Rentals- Motorbikes- don't do it!
S- Seatran- One of the ferry companies that brings you to Koh Tao.
T- Tosh- stray Instructor that went missing- If found proceed with caution, extremely ginger.
U- Unimpeded views- Some great high up viewpoints on koh Tao for your facebook cover page.
V- Venice- I think you may have got on the wrong plane.
W- Waverunner- Big blue's longest boat!
X- Xtreme snorkeling?
Y- Yellow brick road- The road behind Big Blue that goes all the way to Mae Hadd, and back if you're feeling crrrazy.
Z- Zanzibar- Cafe in Sairee, good soup, weird bagels.

 

Come up with your own and post them to Big Blue facebook 

 

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